Grizzly Bear's Anatomy
External Image of A Grizzly Bear
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Skeletal System of a Grizzly Bear
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Digestive System of a Grizzly Bear
The yellow tube is the large intestine, the smaller pink tube before it is the small intestine, the large pink part in the beginning is the stomach, and the pink part at the bottom is the gall bladder.
The yellow tube is the large intestine, the smaller pink tube before it is the small intestine, the large pink part in the beginning is the stomach, and the pink part at the bottom is the gall bladder.











Muscular System of A Grizzly Bear
The muscles around the ribs protect them and the digestive system. The muscles around the neck let it move side to side. The several muscles on the hind legs help propel them to run at high speeds.
The muscles around the ribs protect them and the digestive system. The muscles around the neck let it move side to side. The several muscles on the hind legs help propel them to run at high speeds.



How The Systems Work Together
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A Grizzly Bear's height is about 3 1/2 feet, and about 6-7 feet long. Grizzlies have bilateral symmetry as well. The fur of a Grizzly bear is shades of brown and black, but is lighter toward the tips of the fur. A male Grizzly Bear weighs 300-850 lbs., and a female weighs 200-400 lbs. Males weigh more because over time they have grown bigger to be able to compete for mating oppourtunities. Grizzlies have large humps on their shoulders to dig with enourmous force. Their lifespan is about 20-25 years.

Resources
<Defenders.org. 2008. Defenders of Wildlife. February 21, 2008. http://www.defenders.org/wildlife_and_habitat/wildlife/grizzly_bear.php>
<Bear.org. October 8, 2007. North American Bear Center. February 21, 2008. http://www.bear.org/Grizzly_Bear_Field_Trip.html>
<ankn.uaf.edu. August 21, 2006. Marshall Cultural Atlas. February 24,2008. http://www.ankn.uaf.edu/NPE/CulturalAtlases/ Yupiaq/Marshall/bear/TheBodyofaGrizzlyBear.html>
<American Bear.org. NA. The American Bear Association. February 24, 2008. http://www.americanbear.org/anatomy.htm>
<Science-Art.com. 2003. Science Art. February 24, 2008. http://www.science-art.com/image.asp?id=1005&amp;m=58>